Red Mountain Snowfall Stats

While waiting for this very welcome snow to accumulate, I’ve been geeking out on snowfall statistics, and thought it’d be interesting to calculate what is the actual average annual snowfall at Red Mountain. The Resort publicizes the 300″ figure, but even by their own inflated figures we haven’t got close to that amount in recent history. Tony Crocker at BestSnow credits Red with 275″ per year, but even that seems a bit high. So I made up a spreadsheet, correlating Red’s figures, Tony Crocker’s data, and Rossland snowfall data back to 1905, made a few assumptions, and came up with some interesting results.

10 year average: 203″.

20 year average: 214″.

30 year average: 200″

40 year average: 204″.

We almost always get something in the range of 150″ – 250″, with extremely rare drought years (1977 and 1992) and the occasional powderfests (1975,1983, 1997, and 1999). With 118″ by the end of January, we’re having an average year.

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3 Comments

Filed under Eclectica, Red Mountain

3 responses to “Red Mountain Snowfall Stats

  1. Travis

    You totally need to publish the spreadsheet

    • For snowfall data prior to 2006 I based my calculations on Rossland receiving 75% of Red’s snowfall (based on correlation for the limited amount of overlap in the data). Given that the 10 year average (for which I had 8 years of Red specific data) is almost identical to the 20, 30, and 40 year averages, the 200″ figure seems reasonable. I’ll see if I can get my hands on actual historical data from Red.

  2. cam

    My guess would have been 220″. In terms of base, I wonder how many times we’ve hit 300cm in the past, and what is our record depth?

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